WEST PAPUA FREEDOM FLOTILLA DIRECT ACTION 2015

West Papua Freedom Flotilla spokesperson Izzy Brown has confirmed that the Freedom Flotilla will set sail from Darwin this year to undertake their latest direct action on the high seas to highlight damage caused by multinational corporations and colonial governments on the land and people of West Papua, specifically targeting major shareholder Rio Tinto and the Freeport Grasberg mine in Timika.

”We’re targeting Rio Tinto and the Freeport Grasberg mine because the genocide they are committing on the West Papuan people is disgusting. Not only are they funding the Indonesian military to kill indigenous West Papuans, they are also poisoning the land and water beyond repair and disregarding global environmental standards,” Ms Brown said.

The Freedom Flotilla to West Papua successfully defied the Indonesian Navy and Australian authorities in 2013 when they completed their mission to reconnect West Papuan and Aboriginal Peoples.

After a 5000 kilometre journey from Lake Eyre in South Australia all the way to the so-called Indonesian border north off the Torres Strait Arabunna Elder, Uncle Kevin Buzzacott, delivered sacred water from his own country and ashes from Aboriginal tent embassies around Australia directly to West Papuan leaders.

The secret ceremony took place between two small boats off the south coast of Papua, avoided interception by authorities and gained global media attention putting West Papuan issues in the spotlight.

Flotilla Media Contact for Direct Action: Izzy Brown 0497513584 or 0410535896flag-dawn_fb

Freedom Flotilla – Taking direct action on the high seas

ff2015  Freedom Flotilla – Taking direct action on the high seas against human rights abuses dispossession and poisoning of indigenous land and water in West Papua.

A river of poison flows from the last tropical glassier in the world. It is a sacred place for the Amungme People.The glassier is called Nemangkawi ‘’the white arrow’’. Many people have died by the hands of the Indonesian military who control the area since the mines inception.The Indonesian military are payed over 3 million dollars a year in “protection money” by Freeport McMoran which operates the nearby Grasberg goldmine.

‘’The republic of Indonesia kills people like me, Amungme people, the land the military own in Timika was not bought, it was taken at gunpoint. The Indonesian military is used as a tool by Freeport mine to kill us.’’ Mama Yosepha Alomang.

In 2013 the freedom flotilla reconnected the lands and the struggles of Papuan and Australia indigenous people with a sacred ceremony conducted in the water off the coast of Papua. Indigenous elder Uncle Kevin Buzzacott of Arabuna country in South Australia delivered the sacred water from the mound spring in his country and ashes from the Aboriginal tent embassy’s around Australia to West Papuan Elders leaders and Activist to reconnect the land and people that were once joined.

This year the Freedom Flotilla wants to follow up that reconnection with an action to highlight the suffering of West Papuan People and the damage caused by Multinational companies and colonial governments on the land and people, specifically targeting Rio Tinto’s Freeport mine in Tamika West Papua.

Grasberg Freeport McMoran mine In partnership with Rio Tinto the mine accumulates some 700,000 tonnes of toxic mine waste tailings per day ’(that’s nearly 26 billion tonnes a year) discharged out over the mountain polluting the head waters of the life line of the Amungme people.

West Papua is the scene of the most brutal colonial genocide in the region since Britain’s invasion of Australia. The ‘state torture and terrorism’ inflicted on West Papuans is the saddest and most horrific situation a human being can endure.

SBS: Was it legal to deport West Papuans to PNG?

Murray Silby, Greg Dyett and Stefan Armbruster

October 2nd, 2013

Questions are being raised over whether Australia acted lawfully when it sent seven West Papuan asylum seekers to Papua New Guinea after they were apprehended in the Torres Strait.

Greg Dyett and Stefan Armbruster reports.

People in fear for their lives or political activists intent on grandstanding?

Prime Minister Tony Abbott says the seven are in the latter category and it was appropriate for them to be transported to Port Moresby under a 2003 Memorandum of Understanding with Papua New Guinea.

The seven from the Indonesian province of West Papua, including a 10-year-old child, took part in a ceremony involving the handover of sacred water and ashes from Australian Indigenous elders.

Listen to the story from SBS Radio