SMH: Tony Abbott appears to waver on key parts of his contentious asylum seeker policy

MICHAEL BACHELARD

October 1st, 2013

Tony Abbott has repeatedly refused to say if his signature policy of turning asylum seeker boats back to Indonesia will ever be put into practice.

Asked in Jakarta on Tuesday if his Operation Sovereign Borders would push back any boats he said that, based on his conversations with the Indonesian government, including Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, “we are confident that this problem will be dealt with”.

Asked again, “Will you still turn boats back?”, Mr Abbott replied: “Again, my object here is to stop the boats. And in order to ensure that the boats are stopped I want to have the best possible relationship with Indonesia.”

Asked if he stood by the policies he took to the election, he said: “Of course we stand by our policies, but above all else we want to work effectively to stop the boats. In the end that’s all that really counts: have we stopped the boats.”

Indonesia has opposed the turn-back policy since March, 2010, when Mr Abbott first announced it.

The Prime Minister’s comments seem to concede that he may abandon it as part of a willingness to negotiate a bilateral approach to the issue in meetings on the subject due to convene in coming weeks.

He also appeared to waver on other parts of his contentious policy, saying that village spies and buy-backs of fishing boats were nothing more than a pot of money available to local Indonesian officials “working cooperatively with their Australian counterparts to ensure as far as we can we’ve got people working with us rather than against us”.

He was not asked to comment on the policy of establishing transit ports on Indonesian soil for Australia’s use in moving asylum seekers to Nauru and Manus Island.

Mr Abbott’s apparent concessions to Indonesian sensitivities comes after Dr Yudhoyono conceded on Monday that Indonesia must negotiate directly with Australia on the boats issue, not just through the forum of the Bali Process.

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SBS: Freedom Flotilla may upset Abbotts visit to Indonesia

Posted on September 29th, 2013

Brooke Boney

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has come under fire on a Indonesian newspaper after 31 people died trying to reach Australian shores.

Immigration Minister Scott Morrison confirmed today that four asylum seeker boats had arrived in the last week, including a small group of Papuan activists with links to the Indigenous Freedom Flotilla.

Mr Abbott left Sydney today on his first official visit as Prime Minister and he’s headed to Indonesia. But with the heads of 30 Pacific Nations set to meet in less than a week at the APEC summit, the Freedom Flotilla and West Papuan asylum seekers could be an unwanted topic of discussion for a prime minister looking to strengthen relationships with Indonesia.